July 31, 2014

26.04.10-Amateurs Scour the Solar System.

marshorizon_opportunity

A stunning Martian panorama! (Credit:NASA/JPL Image Processing by Michael Howard & Glen Nagle).

   A quiet sort of revolution has been brewing online. Amateur astronomers have taken to the web on cloudy, light polluted nights and turned newly found computing power normally reserved for gaming and Second Life into something truly productive and phenomenal; the reprocessing of planetary images. This link includes more examples than you can shake a robotic camera arm at; the data is culled not only from the raw image archives of older spacecraft such as Mariner 10 and Voyager 2, but newer generation spacecraft such as the Cassini orbiter around Saturn and the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity pictured above. These images frequently circulate the web and are processed and discussed long before even NASA engineers get to them. And with the mounting number of new missions out there and the transparency and access to public data increasing, the trend is likely to continue. But beyond just pretty pictures, the images dug up often have real scientific merit and value as well; for example, Philosophy professor Ted Stryk actually caught Neptune’s tiny moon Despina in the act of transiting as he sifted through old Voyager data! This makes one wonder; what else might engineers and scientists have missed? Emily Lakdawalla, web editor for the Planetary Society has contributed extensively to this growing revolution of online citizen scientists, taking advantage of Cassini’s equinox mission to produce some stunning images. So give it a try; put that ultimate power sitting idle on your desk to work doing something useful and productive… you just might spot that unknown moon or monolith!

neptune_despina_transit_combo_despinabrightened

A sight never before seen from Earth; the transit of Neptune’s moon Despina! (Credit: NASA/JPL Image processing & Copyright: Ted Stryk).

Trackbacks

  1. [...] old archival data-just a few years back, a desktop sleuth noticed a shadow transit of the tiny Neptunian moon Despina in the Voyager 2 images that researchers [...]

Speak Your Mind

*