December 17, 2017

Review: Boneyards by Kristine Kathryn Rusch.

On sale now!!!

Never get between a gal and her anacapa drive… this week, we take a look at book three and the final (?) installment from the Diving into the Wreck series, Boneyards, out this month from Pyr Books and written by Kristine Kathryn Rusch.  Fans of the series and this space will remember our review of the City of Ruins installment which saw Boss and her team discovering a fully functional (and crewed?) Dignity Vessel in a depot buried deep within the bowels of a planet. [Read more...]

07.05.11: Its International Astronomy Day!

Coming under a sky near you… (Photo by Author).

Batten down the scopes…today is a day when we celebrate all things astronomical. This year, International Astronomy Day as reckoned by the Astronomical League falls on May 7th and October 1st. This weekend is a good time to visit that local astronomy club or planetarium and see what’s happening in the night sky… and if they’re not planning an event, ask em’ why not? [Read more...]

The 2010 Rhysling Anthology.

The year's best in Sci-Fi poetry!

The year's best in Sci-Fi poetry!

 

   This week, we present to you that most vaunted of science fiction awards: The 2010 Ryslings, as presented within the 2010 Rhysling Anthology: The Best Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Poetry of 2009 as selected by the Science Fiction Poetry Association and edited by Jaime Lee Moyer. [Read more...]

31.03.10- S.E.T.I. Turns 10!

Tired of waiting for E.T. to call? Late last year, the distributed computing program that started it all, http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/, turned ten. One of the most scientifically ambitious programs run before bedtime, SETI@Home showed us that computers could do more than display flying toasters in their spare time.  In fact, word of the first SETI@Home way back in ’99 initially convinced us here at Astroguyz that we probably should get a home computer, and we’ve been hooked ever since. Sure, the Vulcan home world has yet to present itself, but this is one of those experiments that even one confirmed positive hit would have some amazing implications!

In 2001, SETI@Home essentially became the world’s largest collective super-computer. But what you may not realize are the changes that have been made, and the ones that are in store. In 2006, a multi-beam sky survey was introduced. Then in 2007, the Astropulse Survey was launched. Further upgrades to come are a Near-Time Persistency Checker, searches beyond the current 2.5MHz Band, and new methods of limiting terrestrial radio interference, as well as a means for users to share new data. What we’d also like to see is a dedicated SETI@Home platform, perhaps via the Allen Telescope Array. SETI currently piggybacks off of Arecibo data, which itself spends most of its time staring at extra-galactic sources, not prime alien country. Anyway, if you haven’t, now’s the time to donate that idle CPU time for what could be the discovery of this or any other century!