December 18, 2017

AstroEvent: Exploring the Lunar Apennines & Ina Caldera.

Ina Caldera as seen from LRO. (Credit: NASA).

Whew! With yet another “Super-Moon” weekend has come and gone, and lunar exploration can now be safely left up to those who know and love the Moon. This week, as said Full Moon gives way to waning gibbous, I’d like to draw your attention to a famous mountain range on the edge of the Mare of Imbrium. The Lunar Apennines or Montes Appenninus lie at the edge of a volcanic scarp and feature some of the largest peaks on the Moon rising as high a 5 kilometers above the surrounding terrain (there’s no sea-level on the Moon). [Read more...]

Review: Falling to Earth by Al Worden and Francis French.

Out from Smithsonian Press!

We’re approaching 40 years since the last human set foot on the Moon, and we’ve yet to have the ability to point at a calendar and state unequivocally when such a feat may happen again. Thus, the era is dwindling when we can hear the stories of these early astronauts, in their own words. This week’s review entitled Falling to Earth tells the tale of NASA astronaut Al Worden, the Command Module pilot for Apollo 15. [Read more...]

Astro-Challenge of the Week: Aristarchus & the TLP.

This week, we turn your attention to the waxing crescent Moon and an enduring mystery that surrounds a unique crater; Aristarchus. About 40 km across, this crater was named after the Greek scientist Aristarchus of Samos by map maker Giovanni Riccioli. This lone crater sits on the Aristarchus plateau amid the Mare Oceanus Procellarum. This crater is near the lunar limb and becomes visible during the early waxing crescent phase, and is markedly brighter than the surrounding lunar plains.

[Read more...]