December 17, 2017

11.10.09: Zooming in on Blazars.

Astronomers have recently utilized an enormous radio telescope to examine some of the most exotic objects in the universe; active galactic nuclei. Sometimes called “Blazars”, these distant galaxies are spewing huge jets of particles at amazing relativistic speeds. These emit immense energy across the electromagnetic spectrum. NASA’s Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope has identified and monitored these sources since its launch in 2008 and now scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy have used the National Science Foundation’s Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to map these jets with unprecedented accuracy. The VLBA is a series of 10 interlinked radio telescopes spanning an area from the Virgin Islands to Hawaii that utilize interferometry to produce an effective baseline of 5,300 miles and can resolve details less than 100 light years across at a distance of 7 billion light years. Fermi, the predecessor to the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory that was de-orbited in 2000, scans the entire sky once every three hours looking for gamma-ray bursts. First spotted in the early 70′s during global monitoring of nuclear weapons tests, pinning down gamma-ray bursts has been the name of the game in astrophysics over the past decades. The backup study proves the link between the gamma-ray emissions seen by Fermi and the energetic radio jets pinpointed by the VLBA… expect more high resolution radio maps to come!