September 21, 2017

May 2011: Life in the Astro-Blogosphere.

April’s rising Pink Moon. (Photo by Author).

The month of May brings with it the beginnings of true summer-like weather for most of the northern hemisphere. We’ve survived a wacky weather spring, and the planets are just starting to peep out from behind the Sun in the dawn sky. What follows is projects in the works and goings-on that are up and coming this month from all things Astroguyz;   [Read more...]

05.06.10: An Exoplanet Family Portrait.

 

The worlds of HR 8799. (Credit: NASA/JPL/CalTech).

The worlds of HR 8799. (Credit: NASA/JPL/CalTech).

 

   Astronomers have recently accomplished another amazing first; the first images of an exoplanetary system taken with modest sized optics. But to perform this feat, several ground-breaking techniques had to first be pioneered. The target was HR 8799, a known exoplanetary system 120 light-years distant in the constellation Pegasus. The instrument was the Hale telescope just north of San Diego, and the team was out of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in San Diego. Using a combination of coronagraph and masking the scope down to a diameter of 1.5 meters in diameter, the team was able to capture the above resulting image. The revolutionary “funnel coronagraph” was necessary to block the swamping light of the parent star; the masking was used to maximize the use of adaptive optics. The image was also taken in the infrared, an area of the spectrum in which the young hot planets generate the most energy. “The trick is to suppress the starlight without suppressing the planet light,” Stated JPL Astrophysicist Gene Serabyn. To give you a sense of scale, the three exoplanets pictured lay about 24 to 68 A.U. from their host sun; our own Jupiter orbits at a distance of about 5 A.U. Not only will the technique be capable of being scaled up for the observatory big guns, but it could also prove effective for space-based platforms, where a tension always exists between what astronomers would like to launch and payload limitations. Expect to see more exoplanet images via this method in the near future!

LIGO: A Quest for Gravity Waves.

LIGO, Livingston. (All Photos by Author).
LIGO, Livingston. (All Photos by Author).

We had to go there… last month’s NASA Tweetup at the Johnson Spaceflight Center saw us undertake the great American road trip from Astroguyz HQ north of Tampa, Florida, to Houston on the other side of the Gulf of Mexico and back. Ever the opportunists, we scoured the route for any astronomical pilgrimages of note. Then, like a bolt from the sky, a lone commenter drew our attention to a recent news piece we did on LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory[Read more...]