December 17, 2017

28.03.10- Messenger Spies High-Energy Solar Neutrons.

After a considerable hiatus, solar cycle 24 is now well under way. And this time, NASA has a key observing platform in the inner solar system; the Messenger spacecraft, bound for an insertion to orbit Mercury in March, 2011. In the intervening time, scientists at the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona have been busying the spacecraft by monitoring the Sun from close proximity. On New Year’s Eve, 2007, the spacecraft was at about half an Astronomical Unit (A.U.) from the Sun when it had the unprecedented opportunity to study high-energy neutrons ejected from a massive solar flare. Unlike 1 minute bursts recorded in near-Earth orbit, Messenger was able to track and record these neutron bursts for 6 to 10 hours. This was accomplished by use of NASA’s Neutron Spectrometer aboard the spacecraft. From this, scientists have predicted a “decayed feedstock” of resulting protons from the flare in the 30 to 100 million electron volt range. Messenger could also clear up a long standing mystery; why do some coronal mass ejections produce huge numbers of energetic protons, while others emit relatively few? This puzzle is of more than casual interest; radiation from CMEs has damaged orbiting satellites in the past, and is of prime concern for space based astronauts. Once Messenger is in permanent orbit about Mercury, it will also have a prime vantage point to monitor the Sun close up for a year uninterrupted. And just in time for a peak in the solar maximum!

Death by Superflare?

A close runner-up in the pantheon of cosmic catastrophes is a killer flare courtesy of our Sun. While this may not be as lethal as a giant space rock, its also much more likely over the span of our short lifetimes. But what is the exact potential hazard posed by this threat? What has happened in the past? And what can be done about it? [Read more...]

A Peek at the Structure of the Sun.

(Blogger’s Note: This paper is a Bloggified version of an essay I submitted last year in a quest for my science teaching degree…it has been re-edited to fit this format.)

The Sun is often touted to introductory astronomy students as our nearest star. Of course, its proximity gives us an unprecedented opportunity to study the behavior of a star up close. But how do we really know what we know? Our friendly neighborhood Sun powers life here on Earth. A stable G2V type star, it fuses hydrogen into helium, while releasing copious amounts of energy in the process. [Read more...]