November 21, 2017

AstroEvent: Would the REAL Blue Moon Please Rise?

 

 

A Heavily Photoshoped Blue Moon...(Photo by Author).

   This week, we here at Astroguyz seek to re-ignite the controversy (or do you say non-troversy?) That swirls in some of the more obsessive astronomical circles; just what is a Blue Moon? Modern vernacular states this as simply the “second Full Moon of a calendar month,” but as researchers first point pointed out in a Sky & Telescope article in the March 1999 edition, the history behind the term is much more convoluted. [Read more...]

21.9.9: The Autumnal Equinox.

Can you feel it? The brunt of northern hemisphere summer is about over, giving  way to our favorite season here at Astroguyz; Fall. It’s not just our collective imagination; this Tuesday marks the Autumnal Equinox, or the spring (vernal) Equinox for those down under. This marks the mid way point for the Sun’s apparent journey form north to south, and the beginning of spring and fall, respectively. Of course, we’re the ones in motion!To be technical, this is the point that the Sun rests at 180 degrees along the ecliptic, and at a right ascension of 12 hours and a declination of exactly 0. This occurs this year at precisely 21:18 hours Universal Time on Tuesday, September 22nd. The Sun will rise exactly due east from your locale and set due west, our personal favorite observation to make on this day (weather willing) to site any potential local “Stonehenge” alignments. [Read more...]

Review: The Cosmic Connection by Jeff Kanipe

Cosmic catastrophe seems to be trending today, much unlike the currently pallid 11-year sunspot cycle. Without a doubt, the next killer asteroid will top your Tweetdeck, although whether it will bump #TGIF and Paris Hilton remains to be seen. The Cosmic Connection: How Astronomical Events Impact Life on Earth, by Jeff Kanipe and out by Prometheus Books comes as a sort of impromptu trilogy of reviews, as fans of this space will remember our recent review of Death from the Skies! And our forthcoming review of Heavens Touch, due out next month. Do not confuse this title with Sagan’s Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective from 1973, which was complete with the trippy space age cover designed to pull in UFO buffs, but was Sagan all the way!

The Cosmic Connection shows how we are intimately related to the continual celestial goings-on all around us, and that we’re ultimately not immune to our stellar environs. I always like to point this out to the astrologically minded; the universe does indeed influence human affairs but not in the mundane way your newspaper horoscope might suggest. Instead, solar activity, supernovae, and even the evolving tilt of our own planet form a continuing ballet, and we’re all along for the ride!

The book opens with a deconstruction of our planet’s own complicated orbital behavior. Cycles such as the precession of the equinoxes the variation of the obliquity and fluctuation of our axial tilt all add up to a very complex affair, and that’s just for starters. Its hard to imagine that the “Goldilocks” epoch that we live in just happens to be stable and “just right” for us to thrive, and that this won’t always be so.

Even our own star, the Sun, is exposed for the notorious side it can sometimes exhibit. Its role in climate change is discussed; we thought that the “exorcism” of the Chamonix glacier, which was prone to advancing 100 acres per day in 1610, was an especially unique tale. The infamous solar season of 1859-1860 is also discussed; we have yet in modern technological times  to see a season quite as active as this one!

Think we know our own cosmic back yard? The Cosmic Connection will give you pause to think again. The chapter …At any time delves into the state and history of Near Earth Object (NEO) detection. For example, did you know that astronomers estimate that there remains perhaps 20,000 Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) of the 140 meter or greater class to be discovered? In a timely fashion, the book makes mention of the October 5th 2008 impact in Sudan, the first time we’ve been able to spot an asteroid before impact. The author also lays out a template for increased funding and efforts towards detection. Of all the cosmic disaster death scenarios, killer space rocks are one of the few that we possess any means to do something about!

And as mentioned, I’ll bet that doomsday asteroid will trend on Twitter…

Even our place and epoch in the galactic scheme of things is addressed. True, a death dealing potential supernova candidate currently doesn’t lurk nearby in our local galactic neighborhood.The currently accepted “kill zone” is a radius of about 25 light years, and Spica and Betelgeuse, at distances of 260 and 425 light years, respectively are the nearest potential candidates. However, as we continue our 225 million year circuit about the galaxy, this will not always be the case. In addition, we bob up and down around the galactic plane, through largely unknown mediums of intergalactic dust. Our overall motion about the center of our galaxy is oblong, with our motion towards the solar apex in the constellation Hercules at about 12 miles per second. About 20 “Galactic Years” have passed since the formation of our solar system, and less than a hundredth of the past GY since the dawn of humanity. The author also points out that we may owe our placid existence to our current placement just outside of whats termed as the Local Bubble, an expanse of 300 light years across in the Orion Arm carved out by ancient supernovae.

All in all, its pretty remarkable to note the cosmic ingredients that go into an Earth as we know it; we live on a planet that orbits a relatively stable star, within its habitable zone, with a Moon to stabilize our tilt, in a supernovae free zone of our galaxy in just the right epoch. Of course, the Drake Equation has been given treatment, as it has here at Astroguyz… the sentiment echoes a recent controversial book, Rare Earth, which posits that our circumstances make life here unique. Of course, we are talking about life that know, as in carbon based, water-loving life…

In the end, the author presents a very convincing argument as to how our existence is intimately related to our evolving place in the cosmos. Consider it a sort of “volume two” in our cosmic review trilogy, Death From the Skies! being first and Heavens Touch to be forth coming. And next clear night, (we do our review reading on the cloudy ones!) be sure to check out the summer Milky Way (if you don’t suffer from light pollution) and thank your lucky stars that we’re here at all to appreciate our privileged place in space and time!

Astro-event of the Week, March 16th-22nd, 2009: The Spring Equinox.

This week’s astro-event is an abstract meeting of the ecliptic and the equator; the spring, or vernal equinox, occurs on Friday, March 20th, 2009 at 07:44 EDT. This is an interesting time to watch the true rising and setting positions of the Sun, as they are directly east and west, respectively, for observers world wide.

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Astro Event of the Week: December 15th-21st: The Winter Solstice.

Take heart, those based in chilly northern climes; the Winter Solstice is on the way. This is the point at which the Sun reaches its most southerly declination as seen from the tilted Earth and begins its long migration northward.

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Astro-event for September 22rd-29th, 2008; An Autumnal Equinox.

Brace yourselves; the Northern Hemisphere is headed towards Fall!

I know, an equinox may not be the sexiest thing to observe, but its onset has deep significance for those positioned in the northern hemisphere. [Read more...]

Harvest Moon; an Update.

Note: you can see the resulting image mentioned at the SpaceWeather link at the end of the article.

This morning in Seminole Florida dawned mostly clear, and I decided to have a go at some early morning Astrophotography.

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