October 21, 2018

Astro-Event of the Week-Redder than Red: V Hydrae.

This week, we here at Astroguyz are going to introduce you to a star that isnít on the top 10 star party faves, but perhaps should be; V Hydrae. [Read more...]

06.11.09:A New Type of Supernova?

Astronomers at† the University of California at Berkley may have added a new type of supernova to the list. Typical type I supernovae consist of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf accreting matter from a companion star until a runaway reaction occurs, while type II supernovae involve a collapse of a star perhaps nine times as massive as our Sun. Recently, astronomers uncovered evidence that an extragalactic supernova previously classified as a type II may in fact deserve a class of its own. Named SN 2002bj, this exploding star exhibited the characteristics of a garden variety nova, such as the brief flare up of in-falling hydrogen, but created an explosion 1,000 times more massive. In the case of SN 2002bj, however, the flash also had a conspicuous absence of hydrogen, with instead a strong helium flash and the presence of vanadium in its spectra, a first for a supernova. Theoretical models suggest that this may have been a binary white dwarf pair, with one feeding the other a steady flow of helium until it reached the collapse limit and burst. Also, unlike typical type Ia supernovae, the white dwarf involved survived the explosion. Another unusual signature to this supernova was the way it rapidly faded from sight in about 20 days, about four times faster than usual. SN 2002bj is located in the galaxy NGC 1821 and was spotted in February 2002. Does the classification of supernovae need tweaking?