April 19, 2014

13.02.11: A Monster in M87.

Anatomy of a Beast. (Credit: NASA/Chandra Observatory).

Take look at the image above. This was taken by NASA’s Chandra X-Ray observatory of the heart of the M87 galaxy in the constellation Virgo. Well known to backyard observers as one of the highlights of the Virgo galaxy cluster, M87 harbors something truly spectacular; one of the most massive black holes known. In fact, researchers American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle Washington earlier last month upgraded to WOW factor of the M87, calculating a mass of 6.6 billion suns. [Read more...]

16.05.10- Gliese 710: A Future Stellar Threat?

gl710_skyview

Gliese 710 inbound…(Credit: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey).

   Our quiet corner of the local galaxy may be in for a future interloper. A possible solar system side-swipe comes in the form of Gliese 710, an unassuming +10 magnitude orange dwarf star currently 63 light years distant in the constellation Serpens. As we swirl around the center of our galaxy, stellar neighbors come and go like in-laws during your favorite respective obligatory familial holiday season. The low proper motion of this star hid its true nature until about a decade ago; generally, the lower the apparent motion, the more distant the star. Gliese 710, however, fits into a different class; a star that shows a low apparent motion because it’s moving towards us. Closest approach has been calculated by astronomer Joan Garcia-Sanchez of JPL as about 1.3 light years in 1.5 million years time. Doesn’t sound like much? Well, this skirts the edge of our Oort Cloud, that vast reservoir of comets that extends out to about 1.6 light years distant…Gliese 710 stands an 86% chance of breaking this threshold. In addition, a 2007 review of Hipparcos data by Vadim V. Bobylev shows that this star may pass as close as 0.02 of a light year, about 50 times farther than the (sometimes) planet Pluto. This could make things really interesting, as Gliese 710 could really stir things up in our Oort cloud. And of course, there is the question of whether or not Gliese 710 has an Oort Cloud of its own. More than likely, this pulse of comets will last for about a several million year span of time. Could our inner solar system have sustained such shocks before? One only has to look at the crater-scarred surface of our Moon to realize the inner solar system has served as a shooting gallery over the eons. The statistical probability of a really (i.e. 1,000 AU) approach is about 1 in 10,000, so don’t max out those credit cards just yet… this uncertainly stems from incomplete knowledge of all the gravitational factors at work. As more sensitive astrometrical platforms, such as ESA’s Gaia spacecraft come online, the nature of the threat from Gliese 710 will be more precisely known. At its closest approach, this inbound star will be about as bright as the red giant star Antares… here’s to the neighbors!

11.05.10: Ancient Galaxy Mergers.

Hickson Compact Group 31. (Credit: NASA/HST/ESA/S. Gallagher/J. English).

Hickson Compact Group 31. (Credit: NASA/HST/ESA/S. Gallagher/J. English).

 

   Astronomers may have found a cosmological missing link in the realm of galactic evolution. The early universe was a crowded place; galaxy mergers must have been much more common in the primeval universe than they are today. But studying those early collisions has been problematic; the immense distances involved over time and space mean that resolving clusters and individual stars are out of the question. Now, a team from the University of Western Ontario led by Sara Gallagher has published a study of an object which may serve as a “living fossil” of those early times; Hickson Compact Group 31. A cluster of irregular galaxies “only” 166 million light years away in the constellation Eridanus, this merger has somehow escaped coalescence over 10 billion years of cosmic history to just begin merging. “Because HCG 31 is so nearby,” Gallagher notes, “we can indentify individual star clusters.” In fact, two main components of HCG 31 approach visual magnitude +13 and have been snared by amateur instruments. HCG 31 is approximately 75,000 light years in diameter, and will probably one day form one huge elliptical galaxy. To conduct this study, Gallagher utilized time and instruments that spanned the spectrum, from Hubble in visible light to Spitzer in infrared to Galex and Swift in the ultraviolet. It is amazing that astronomers now have such capabilities in their bag of tricks at their ready disposal!

04.04.10-Fermi: Einstein Still Rules.

 

High & Low energy photons race through frothy space! (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State University/Aurore Simonnet).

High & Low energy photons race through frothy space! (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State University/Aurore Simonnet).

   We just can’t seem to get enough of NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The successor to the late Compton observatory that was de-orbited in 2002, Fermi has already pinpointed over 1,000 discrete gamma-ray sources, five times more than previously known. Now Fermi has also provided a rare test of Einstein’s theories of relativity. Relativity says that all electromagnetic waves (including highly energetic gamma-rays) travel through space at the same cosmic speed of 186,282 miles per second. Being a classical theory, however, what Einstein doesn’t do is meld gravity satisfactorily with the other three fundamental forces; electromagnetism and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Gravity stubbornly refuses to be unified, and such a goal has been the holy grail of physics for over the last half century. An alternative model of gravity at the microscopic scale would say that the nature of space-time is “frothy,” and a predicted effect should be a measureable drag induced on high energy photons. Recently, Fermi had a chance to put this to the test; on May 10th of last year, GRB 090510, a short gamma-ray burst 7.3 billion light years distant, was measured by Fermi’s Large Area Telescope. The verdict; gamma-ray photons varying a by a factor of a million times in energy arrived just nine-tenths of a second apart, far below what would be predicted by “frothy” space… that’s round one for Einstein!