December 22, 2014

22.05.11: Meteoroids: Sandblasting Satellites?

0.84mm diameter strike on the window of Shuttle Columbia seen after STS-35. (Credit: NASA).

Next time you use your mobile or GPS to bounce signals off of a satellite, thank Stanford professor Ingrid Close… she and other researchers like her think about meteoroid strikes and their potentially crippling effects on spacecraft, so hopefully you don’t have to. [Read more...]

11.05.11: Voyager: The Humanoids Where Here.

Decoding the disk; are you smarter than a humanoid? (Credit: NASA/JPL).

If we were to vanish from the cosmic scene tomorrow, what would be our most lasting impact? Would it be our monuments, our terrestrial relics, or our broadcasts of I Love Lucy and the Jerry Springer Show? Thankfully, researchers in the 1970’s designed a “message in a bottle” to be tossed out across the cosmic sea attached to the twin Voyager spacecraft. Launched in 1977, both spacecraft reconnoitered the outer planets before being flung on trajectories that will leave our solar system. [Read more...]

28.04.11: Can You Say “Pioneer Non-nomaly?”


Pioneer; Looking Back. (Credit: Artists conception NASA/JPL).

Every advocate of alternative physics’ favorite spacecraft anomaly has been finally laid to rest recently. In 1972 & 1973 The Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft were sent on trajectories past Jupiter and Saturn that would take them out of the solar system. Now at a distance of 103 and 83 A.U. moving at 11.5 km per second, these spacecraft fell silent in 2003. [Read more...]

LCROSS target crater announced.

A map of potential LCROSS canidate targets. (Credit: NASA/LCROSS).

A map of potential LCROSS canidate targets. (Credit: NASA/LCROSS).

Scientists at NASA have announced the candidate target crater for the LCROSS impactor on October 9th; Cabeus A, a 11km wide polar crater thought to contain the ever- elusive water ice. The Centaur upper stage will slam into the carter floor at 7:30 AM EDT, at which time the Moon will be waning gibbous, and about 70% illuminated, and favoring viewers in the Americas (including Astroguyz HQ!). Contrary to earlier fears, LCROSS has enough fuel to make final maneuvers for impact. Both Keck observatories and LCROSS’s twin, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, as well as a multitude of eager amateur observers will be on hand to witness this rare event!