April 25, 2014

27.03.10- Modeling Black Holes.

Simulation of the environs of a black hole. (Credit: NASA).

Simulation of the environs of a black hole. (Credit: NASA).

 

   Researchers are calling in the big guns in the quest to understanding black holes. Specifically, scientists at the Rochester Institute of Technology are using time on some of the fastest and most powerful computers in use to model and predict the activity of super massive black holes. But these aren’t your ordinary off the shelf PCs; their laboratory New Horizons machine is a computer cluster of 85 nodes with 4 processors that is capable of passing data at a rate of 10 gigabytes per second. Try that on your family Mac book! Further grants totaling $2.9 million will enable the team to hone their theoretical models over the next 3 years on ever faster machines. “It’s a thrilling time to study black holes, ” states center director Manuela Campanelli. If predictions match observations, these models may also serve as the best proof yet of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity…more to come!

20.03.10: Spying a Black Hole Welterweight.

An Artist's conception of NGC 5408 X-1. (Credit: NASA).

An Artist's conception of NGC 5408 X-1. (Credit: NASA).

  

   Astronomers now have observational evidence for a missing class of black hole. Stellar mass black holes, those up to about 10 solar masses, are well known as the remnants of supernovae. Likewise for supermassive black holes of 10,000 solar masses or greater known to reside in the hearts of galaxies like our own. The “missing link” in astrophysics has been intermediate mass black holes, or those between 100 and 10,000 solar masses. Now, scientists at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland have used the XMM-Newton and Swift X-ray satellites to pinpoint a likely candidate; NGC 5408 X-1, a black hole with about 1,000 to 9,000 solar masses in a galaxy about 15.8 million light years away in the constellation Centaurus. This would include an event horizon about 3,800 to 34,000 miles across. An X-ray flux occurs once every 115.5 days, strongly suggesting that NGC 5408 X-1 has a stellar companion accreting donor material. This star would be 3-5 times the Sun’s mass.   “Astronomers have been studying NGC 5408 X-1… because it’s one of the best candidates for an intermediate mass black hole.” States Philip Kaaret of the University of Iowa. The contributing companion also gives astronomers the unique opportunity to probe the near-space environment as well as study this intermediate class of enigmatic objects.