September 23, 2017

Review: The Man Who Sold the Moon & Orphans of the Sky by Robert A. Heinlein

On sale now!

This week, we return to “Lessons from Science Fiction 101,” with a look at a master of scifi.

We’re talking, of course, about American science fiction author Robert A. Heinlein. One of the “Big 3” next to Clarke and Asimov when it comes to golden age science fiction, no one was better a weaving in sociological issues into their future mythology. [Read more...]

Review: Assignment in Eternity by Robert Heinlein

On sale now!

Why read old scifi? We’ve often heard this question kicked around in the darkened corners of science fiction conventions and on ye’ ole cyber webs. Hey, it’s true that we now live in an age where such red-letter sci-fi dates as 2001 and 1984 have come and gone… and even The Terminator’s Skynet was to have been long since operational by now. [Read more...]

Review: The Man-Kzin Wars Created by Larry Niven: the 25th Anniversary Edition

On sale now!

I love Niven’s Known Universe saga.  I was first introduced to this hard sci-fi future world via his landmark novel, Ringworld, still one of my all-time faves.

One enduring race in the Known Universe tales is the Kzinti, an intelligent and aggressive cat-like species. The Kzinti (or Kzin) are one of the most fascinating alien races in all of science fiction. I remember eagerly picking up and reading the very first installment of The Man-Kzin Wars series as a young Airman while stationed at Misawa Air Base, Japan.

And it’s hard to believe that it has been 25 years. This week’s review is The Man-Kzin Wars: the 25th Anniversary Edition created by Larry Niven. This new edition, out from Baen Books includes a new forward by the author and an introduction by series cover illustrator Stephen Hickman. The series is one of the longest running serializations in science fiction, and has cranked out thirteen volumes thus far. Number fourteen is due out in December of this year.

Niven reminiscences that he was at first reluctant to hand over the keys to the Known Space universe, but is now glad that he did. The first volume features two short stories and one novelette; The Warriors, by Larry Niven, Iron by Poul Anderson, & Cathouse by Dean Ing.

The Warriors is the original introductory tale by Niven himself outlining the fateful first contact between Man and Kzin. This comes at a time when humans have forsaken conflict for centuries, and have virtually no weaponry. The imperial Kzinti, however, are taken aback by a key piece of our technology, which, in turn, saves our primate hides. I always love how Niven’s stories are grounded in hard science and astrophysics— he’s the Clarke of his generation. Niven himself also notes in the new intro that he “doesn’t do war stories…” Perhaps it was for the best that he allowed other writers to create a new take on the Kzinti universe.

Poul Anderson was a wise choice for Iron, a tale of humans and Kzin clashing over a lost technology. Anderson’s style is much like Niven’s, in that he can paint a convincing planet-scape. The Kzin, while aggressive, have actually co-opted much of their space-faring technology from other races, much like the alien invaders in Niven’s Footfall.

Cathouse by Dean Ing rounds out the book with a fascinating look at the often bypassed female Kzin. As unveiled in the Ringworld saga, contact and war with humanity has also forced the Kzin to evolve as well.

It’s also a small wonder that Niven’s novels (especially Ringworld) have never made it to the big screen.  Perhaps this is actually a good thing, as special effects technology is just now reaching the point where it can finally do justice to Niven’s vision. Fun-filled fact: did you know that the Kzinti were animated in the Star Trek universe of the early 1970’s?

Be sure to check out the anniversary edition of the book that started it all… expect more Man-Kzin Wars reviews on this site soon!

 

Review: Sixth Column by Robert Heinlein.

On sale now!

Heinlein is one of the greats, an American Science fiction master on par with Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov.  I grew up reading such works by the seminal great at Space Cadet, Farmer in the Sky, and Friday. To date, die-hard fans still rave about his Starship Troopers as “Star Wars before there was a Star Wars” and lament its 1997 movie adaptation. And with his naval background, Heinlein can arguably be called the grandfather of military sci-fi to boot. [Read more...]

Review: Alpha Centauri by William Barton and Michael Capobianco.

A Science Fiction Classic!

This week, we here at Astroguyz are taking a break from bringing you the cutting edge commentary on up and coming science fiction and groundbreaking works of science that you’ve come to know and love and are instead reaching into our way back machine and reviewing a tale from our copious shelves. This week’s offering is Alpha Centauri by William Barton and Capobianco. Alpha Centauri is a tale of the first interstellar mission to the nearest star system, a mission that departs a desperately over-crowded and socially collapsing solar system. [Read more...]

Review: A World Out of Time by Larry Niven.

A Hard Sci-Fi Classic!

This week, we want to take you forward in time via an often overlooked science fiction classic. In the modern era of cyber-punk and sword and sorcery that masquerades as Sci-Fi, author Larry Niven gives us tales that are still rooted in hard science. I like to think of writers of this ilk as counter-revolutionaries, or authors that meld today’s science with the sensibilities of a Clarke or an Asimov. Ringworld put him on the map, and other tales such as The Mote in God’s Eye or Footfall are like manna from heaven for those of us who like our science fiction with a splash of Sagan’s Cosmos. [Read more...]

Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.

Hitchhikers’ Guide fills in a much needed void in Sci-Fi; that of the long form comedy.

[Read more...]