June 23, 2017

Review: Starlight Nights by Leslie Peltier

An astronomy classic!

Did you know that there are oodles of books out on the web for free? And no, we’re not talking about Amazon Prime, but sites such as Project Gutenberg where stuff that’s long since been in the public domain is free to download as a pdf for off-line perusal on ye ole smart phone. [Read more...]

Astronomy Video of the Week: Reclaiming the Night

Dark skies over Bruneau Dunes State Park, Idaho.

Photo by author.

Have you ever stood under a truly dark night sky? In 2015, fewer and fewer citizens of our modern technological age even know what that means, as the light polluted suburbs encroach on once pristine tracks of dark sky wilderness.

Recently, we came across an exciting new Indiegogo project to produce a documentary named Reclaiming the Night. [Read more...]

Week 20: Flying High Over the Sierra Nevadas

Flight! Taking to the air with Soaring NV.

(All photos by author).

You’ve never truly flown until you’ve taken to the air in a glider.

This past week saw us cross the state of California from west to east, and depart Santa Rosa after last week’s adventures and cross over the Sierra Nevadas into the Silver State. Like most Americans, we’d “been to Vegas,” but soon found that we hadn’t truly been to Nevada. [Read more...]

Dark Skies 2014: The Journey Begins

Astro-Lab, ready for departure…

The first single step is almost upon us…

Welcome to the brave new world of Astroguyz. Ever since we decided to “check out that blogging thing” seven years ago in May 2007, we’ve been about change.  Sure, the web has changed and we’ve evolved along with it.

This week, we’re taking that evolution a step further as we prepare to embark on an extended sabbatical across the United States, and perhaps, beyond. Starting in Florida next week on June 1st, we’ll be meandering northward in search of that most elusive and mythical beastie of all: truly dark skies. [Read more...]

13.10.09:A Hawaiian Mega-scope?

A Big *&^%@ scope! (Credit: Artists' concept:the TMT consortium).

A Big *&^%@ scope! (Credit: Artists' concept:the TMT consortium).

The green light was given earlier this year in mid-July as to the site selection for a telescope that if built, will be the largest in the world. The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be parked atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii, home to a collection of scopes, including the Keck, Subaru, and Gemini instruments. As its name suggests, this telescope will sport a reflecting 30 meter mirror comprised of 492 hexagonal segments and operate in the near infrared as well as visible light. Its to be seen whether this will move the environmental lobby to protest as construction on Mauna Kea did in 2002. A point often missed in these debates is that the telescopes themselves need pristine dark skies to operate; this assures that over-development in the form of Costcos and subdivisions won’t visit the slopes of Mauna Kea anytime soon. A follow-up contender for the TMT is Mt. Cerro Armazones in the Atacama Desert in Chile, also dubbed the “most eligible mountain without an observatory.” The seeing is also a bit better in the Atacama, but of course that would mean the exodus of more American science (and dollars) overseas. The European Union is also eying Armazones for a possible site for its two main contenders: the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) at 24.5 meters, and the European Extremely Large Telescope (EELT) at a whooping 42 meters. Its sobering to think that these mega scopes may be the final say of large aperture on Earth; at a proposed 2 billion dollars to build the TMT, it becomes more cost effective to carry on further “aperture wars” in space!