October 31, 2014

Review: What Are Gamma-ray Bursts? by Joshua S. Bloom.

Out from Princeton Press!

In 1888, astronomer Simon Newcomb made the now infamous quip that “we are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy…” One has to wonder what these 19th century scientists would make of the wonderful cosmological menagerie of black holes, energetic galactic nuclei, and the topic of today’s review. [Read more...]

Review: Seeing Further Edited by Bill Bryson.


Out from Harper Collins Press.

Few realize in this relatively enlightened age that our outlook on the world around us has been shaped by a pioneering few who often went against the grain. This week, we look at Seeing Further: The Story of Science, Discovery, & the Genius of the Royal Society. This collection of essays traces the 350 year history of the British Royal Society, first established in 1660. Over the years, the Society has hosted such luminaries as Isaac Newton, Joseph Banks, and Francis Crick, to name a very brief few. [Read more...]

Review: How Did the First Stars and Galaxies Form? By Abraham Loeb.

 

Out Now from Princeton University Press!

   One of the crucial questions in modern cosmology is: why is there anything at all? Why are we here to admire the cosmos, and create books and blogs about how clever we are to figure it all out? Why didn’t the early universe promptly annihilate itself in a massive matter/anti-matter collision? [Read more...]

Review: The Age of Wonder by Richard Holmes.

Out now from Pantheon Books!

Out now from Pantheon Books!

 

 Every once in a while, a book crosses our nightstand that just makes us say “Wow…” We then have to ration out this discovered gem, lest we burn the midnight oil and consume it in one lost weekend…

Such a discovery came to us in the form of recent book The Age of Wonder by Richard Holmes. Out by Pantheon Books, this huge opus does nothing short of charting the course of science through the early 1800’s. From Joseph Banks to William Herschel to Humphrey Davies, many a fascinating untold tale is contained in this book. I explicitly saved this book for reading during our Ecuador trek late last year, as adventure travel deserves good reading to go along with it. Each of these tales are an engaging read, and cover such diverse fields as astronomy, chemistry, anthropology, and botany. Of course, since this is an astronomically based blog, the chapters on William Herschel came first. [Read more...]